Check Your Pocket For Spare Change Because These Coins Are Worth More Than You Would Think

Published on 06/11/2020
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For most people living in the “contactless payment” age, it is annoying to carry around so many coins. It is true that money is still money, but it can be inconvenient to count and store these metal discs. They are lightweight enough and pleasantly shiny, although most people would rather not carry them around. Why bother with spare change when you can pay with a card instead? We understand this dilemma of yours, but we also have something that might change your mind if you always find yourself asking, “Why can’t these just be bills?”

Check Your Pocket For Spare Change Because These Coins Are Worth More Than You Would Think

Check Your Pocket For Spare Change Because These Coins Are Worth More Than You Would Think

The truth is that you might have a seriously valuable thing amid all your spare change. It is true that the vast majority of them are worth nothing more than a dollar, a half dollar, a quarter, a dime, or a nickel. However, you might get lucky and find something with a value that is exponentially bigger than that! Who knows, you might actually be sitting on $400,000 all this time. We highly recommend reaching for your spare change and checking if you have any of these coins.

The “No Mark” Dime From 1982

This was the first time in the history of the United States that a coin without a mint mark entered the circulation. It is strange that they found a lot of these dimes at Cedar Point, the popular amusement park in Ohio. You might want to check if you have any of these because they go for over $1,300.

The “No Mark” Dime From 1982

The “No Mark” Dime From 1982

The “Speared Buffalo” Nickel From 2005

Here is an improperly minted nickel minted in 2005. That was the year that they used the buffalo design once more. However, there were gouges on the back of the buffalo that were actually minting errors. One of them went up for auction at $1,265!

The “Speared Buffalo” Nickel From 2005

The “Speared Buffalo” Nickel From 2005

The Gold Mormon Coins From 1851

These $5 coins were made by the Latter-day Saints during the gold rush of the 1840s. The gold used for these coins had come from Sutter’s Mill, California. If you have one of them, you are in for $50,000.

The Gold Mormon Coins From 1851

The Gold Mormon Coins From 1851

The “Double Die Liberty” Penny From 1995

There are plenty of coins on our list that come with minting errors, which caused the inflation of the value. Look at the “error coin” below, which had a double print of “Liberty.” You should pay attention to the “R” or “B.” As you can see, it looks like there is some sort of double vision going on there. The flawed penny will go for over $50 in an uncirculated condition.

The “Double Die Liberty” Penny From 1995

The “Double Die Liberty” Penny From 1995

The “Wide AM” Penny From 1999

Who would have thought that you can get so much money thanks to a tiny error? Maybe you noticed that the “A” and “M” on the penny look far apart. If you look at a regular penny, you will see that those letters should almost be touching. A Wide AM penny in pre-circulated condition will go for about $530.

The “Wide AM” Penny From 1999

The “Wide AM” Penny From 1999

The Sacagawea “Cheerios” Dollar From 2000

A year prior to the turn of the century, Sacagawea dollars were added to boxes of General Mills cereal as a contest. However, the design had not been ready in time for the date they announced. This was the reason the U.S. Mint helped them by providing a version of an existing design that was slightly altered. Only four such coins have been discovered. If you ever come across another one, know that it is worth $2,677!

The Sacagawea “Cheerios” Dollar From 2000

The Sacagawea “Cheerios” Dollar From 2000

The “Extra Low Leaf” Wisconsin Quarter From 2004

This might look like a regular 25 cent coin, but there is actually an additional lower leaf on the corn stalk. The 2004 Wisconsin quarter has gone up in value thanks to this error. Rumor has it that the circulation currently holds 5,500 such coins. At the moment, it goes for around $140, which is not bad!

The “Extra Low Leaf” Wisconsin Quarter From 2004

The “Extra Low Leaf” Wisconsin Quarter From 2004

The “Extra High Lead” Wisconsin Quarter From 2004

Here is a different minting error for the 2004 Wisconsin quarter. It also has to do with an extra leaf, but this one is standing higher up on the stalk. You should check your coin purse if you have this one. It is a little rarer than the other minting error, so it is worth more. If you have one, you can expect $168 for it.

The “Extra High Lead” Wisconsin Quarter From 2004

The “Extra High Lead” Wisconsin Quarter From 2004

The “In God We Rust” Kansas Quarter From 2005

This might just be the funniest error on our list. Instead of saying “In God We Trust,” This coin instead says, “In God We Rust.” The error apparently happened thanks to all the excess grease that had built up in the printers. It is a fun quarter that we would love to have! A coin in mint condition goes for $100.

The “In God We Rust” Kansas Quarter From 2005

The “In God We Rust” Kansas Quarter From 2005

The “Godless” Presidential Dollar From 2007

In 2010, a “Godless” Presidential Dollar went up on eBay for a little more than a thousand bucks. However, it normally goes anywhere from $30 to $125. With that said, the new series removed the “In God We Trust” part of the dollar. This was actually a highly publicized error back in the day!

The “Godless” Presidential Dollar From 2007

The “Godless” Presidential Dollar From 2007

The US Philippines Peso From 1906

In case you did not know, the United States occupied the Philippine Islands from 1901 to 1935. The U.S. Mint helped the Philippines Mint print a number of coins like the 1906 Peso. A lot of them were melted down or lost, but the coin was made with pure silver. There are thousands of them in existence at the moment, but many are false or counterfeits. A real one in mint condition went for $40,000 in 2019!

The US Philippines Peso From 1906

The US Philippines Peso From 1906

The Alaska Rural Rehabilitation Token From 1935

In the past, the Emergency Relocation Administration relocated Alaskan families, who received $10 “scrip” coins that could be used in government stores. When the need for the coin died out, most of them got melted down. If you are ever lucky enough to stumble into one, keep in mind that it is worth $1,750!

The Alaska Rural Rehabilitation Token From 1935

The Alaska Rural Rehabilitation Token From 1935

The Sacagawea “Dollar with Errors” From 2000

When they first made the 2000 Sacagawea coin, some of them were made of a copper-nickel mix and not the intended bronze material. Thanks to the “transitional” errors, the golden coins did not end up being really golden. In 2013, one such misprint was sold by Heritage Auctions for more than $7,600.

The Sacagawea “Dollar with Errors” From 2000

The Sacagawea “Dollar with Errors” From 2000

The Wheat “No Mark” Error Penny From 1937

You are out of luck if you thought that wheat pennies are unique. However, you might have hit the jackpot if you stumble into one made in 1937. You can figure out if you have one because you not going to see the small “d” marking that the others have. In 2019, a mint one went for $7,200.

The Wheat “No Mark” Error Penny From 1937

The Wheat “No Mark” Error Penny From 1937

The Hawaiian Plantation Token

Like a couple of entries on the list, the Hawaiian Plantation Token was not official money. Even though the U.S. Mint made some of them, the coins had been used as currency on Hawaiian sugar plantations. Even though they could not be used outside of those places, they hold a lot of value in this day and age. As a matter of fact, one of them was sold for more than $11,000 in 2014.

The Hawaiian Plantation Token

The Hawaiian Plantation Token

The Double Die Penny From 1969

Here is one of the most valuable coins that you are going to find in history! Take a look at this double-stamped penny. It is such an unusual coin that the Secret Service assumed that it was counterfeit. You might be sitting on more than $45,000 if you happen to own one of these in mint condition.

The Double Die Penny From 1969

The Double Die Penny From 1969

The Double Die Penny From 1972

The 1972 double die penny is quite similar to the one from 1969. The head side was also printed twice. The most glaring errors here would be the “1972” and “LIBERTY” marks. If you have one in mint condition, you might just have $1,600 on your hands.

The Double Die Penny From 1972

The Double Die Penny From 1972

The Double Die, Small Date Penny From 1970

The San Francisco mint produced all of these double head printed pennies that come with a smaller date font. You can figure it out thanks to the double “S” signature on the coin. To this day, there have only been eight copies found. If you find one in excellent condition, you can get $37,000 for it!

The Double Die, Small Date Penny From 1970

The Double Die, Small Date Penny From 1970

The Kennedy Silver Half Dollar From 1964

The Kennedy Half Dollars in uncirculated condition range in value from $500 to $1,500. In case you did not know, half dollars were last minted using 90% silver and above in 1964. The ones that came out from 1965 to 1970 have less than half of that amount at only 40% silver! This explains its value.

The Kennedy Silver Half Dollar From 1964

The Kennedy Silver Half Dollar From 1964

Half Dollars From 1965 To 1970

The silver half dollar coin has a higher value than its cent value, although it might not be in the way that you think. The coins might not exactly be rare, but they do contain silver at any rate. This is the reason its value is higher than its actual spending value. You can get four times the value of these $0.50 coins!

Half Dollars From 1965 To 1970

Half Dollars From 1965 To 1970

The “Double Ear” Penny From 1977

In simple terms, Abraham Lincoln was printed with a double earlobe on this coin. The “monstrosity” did not come about thanks to a double stamp. Instead, it was an unintentional production error. It might not be immediately noticeable, but one of these is going to fetch you $450.

The “Double Ear” Penny From 1977

The “Double Ear” Penny From 1977

The Connecticut Regular Strike Quarter From 1999

In 1999, a stamping “error” made Mr. Washington truly stand out thanks to that border around the head. Well, we have to say that it really made him pop. Just so you know, these were simply incorrectly stamped. A couple of these have gone for $25, but more heavily imprinted ones can go for thousands.

The Connecticut Regular Strike Quarter From 1999

The Connecticut Regular Strike Quarter From 1999

The “No S” Dime From 1975

In 1975, these dimes were printed as part of proof sets. These are coins for collectors! It is interesting to hear that the times did not have the “S” mark that signifies it was made at the San Francisco Mint. The coins were made for collectors from the get-go, but the fact that these errors exist makes the value go up. If you ever found one, you might be in for half a million bucks.

The “No S” Dime From 1975

The “No S” Dime From 1975

The Aluminum Penny From 1974

Back when copper was worth a lot of money, the U.S. Mint tried to produce stamped pennies made of aluminum. There were around 1.5 million coins produced. This idea was later scrapped and almost all of them got melted down, although lucky collectors have managed to get their hands on a few. None of these have been sold as only two have been found thus far, with the Smithsonian Museum owning one of them. Collectors believe that one of these babies would get you almost a quarter of a million bucks. Wow!

The Aluminum Penny From 1974

The Aluminum Penny From 1974

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